New York, Oct. 30, 1850. Dear sir--the Whig Nominating Committee of the Eighteenth Ward have nominated as our candidate to represent us in the Assembly of this state, a person by the name of William D. Greene, a man who has never voted in our ward, but is the person understood to have married, recently, a notorious prostitute by the name of "Sal Tuttle," and for many years kept a house of ill-fame in the lower part of the city. Whigs of the 18th Ward.

New York, Oct. 30, 1850. Dear sir--the Whig Nominating Committee of the Eighteenth Ward have nominated as our candidate to represent us in the Assembly of this state, a person by the name of William D. Greene, a man who has never voted in our ward, but is the person understood to have married, recently, a notorious prostitute by the name of "Sal Tuttle," and for many years kept a house of ill-fame in the lower part of the city ....

[New York]: n.p., 1850. 1 sheet. 7 1/2 x 9 3/4 inches. First edition. A very good+ clean copy with mail folds, small watermark in one corner, leaf browning at edges. Item #43049

Opposes candidate William D. Greene and calls for the Whig Nominating Committee of the Eighteenth Ward to select a different candidate for State Assembly. William D. Greene was a clerk for Harvey Hart in the NYC Bureau of Taxes who lived in the 18th Ward (15th St. near Fifth Avenue). Already in 1850 the New York City Whig Party was fracturing with a contingent opposing the Compromise of 1850. The conflict had come to a head just a month before this letter, when the conservative faction left the convention under the leadership of Francis Granger and were known as the Silver Gray Whigs. Perhaps Greene was caught in the cross fire. OCLC locates only one copy: New York Historical Society.

Price: $400.00

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